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A HOME AT THE END OF THE WORLD

WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH ANTARCTICA—THAT IMPOSSIBLY COLD, ICY, BARREN, AND ENTIRELY UNINHABITABLE TERRAIN THAT'S LITERALLY AT THE END OF THE WORLD?

CLAIM IT!
Argentina, Australia, Chile, France, New Zealand, Norway, and the United Kingdom have all, somewhat preposterously, made territorial claims on Antarctica—as has the unrecognized state of Westarctica. Technically, though, Antarctica is governed by the Antarctic Treaty, signed in 1959 by 45 member nations. Two of the signatory nations, Russia and the US, have reserved the right to make a land claim in the future, though they haven't so far. None of the existing claims are recognized by other nations, by the Antarctic Treaty, or by any international law or accord, so they're essentially meaningless—demonstrations, writ large, of the human instinct for grabbiness. That's mine! says the child. As do mighty nation-states.
The treaty, helpfully, stipulates that countries can allow military personnel to work in the region for research purposes, but they can't set up bases or test nuclear bombs. There's a flora-and-fauna protection clause, too. And the treaty, rather sweetly, mandates that all disputes must be solved peacefully.

WATCH IT MELT!
In September 2004, an international team of scientists revealed that the Amundsen Sea glaciers, on the Pacific Ocean side of Antarctica, have lately been melting so rapidly, thanks to global warming, that they are single-handedly raising the sea level by 0.008 inches a year—contributing to the overall worldwide rate of 0.07 inches a year. The rate of acceleration has been steadily increasing,
which is troublesome, because new satellite and aircraft surveillance data reveal that the Amundsen Sea glaciers are much bigger than previously thought—big enough, in fact, to raise sea levels by about four feet once fully melted.







Since we figured no one's going to stop us, COLORS is—before it's too late—hereby claiming the slice delineated on the map shown here. we assure you that our aims are peaceful. We're just thinking of moving certain editorial personnel to more spacious quarters. Subscription fulfillment too, perhaps.
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